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Reading Assignment - Class #21

Please read mitzvot #111 –114.  There are quite a few technical sections in these essays.  See if you can answer these questions from the reading to help you figure them out.

 

Mitzvah # 111

  1. According to Torah law, d’oraita, what wine does this mitzvah prohibit us from drinking? 
  2. According to rabbinic law, d’rabanan, what wine are we prohibited from drinking?  What is that wine called?
  3. How much wine of each type does on have to drink to be liable to punishment?  What is the punishment for each?
  4. D’oraita, under what circumstances can one person’s actions result in the owner of the property being forbidden to get benefit from the property?
  5. D’rabanan, under what circumstances can one person’s actions result in the owner of the property being forbidden to get benefit from the property?
  6. What is the solution proposed by Rabbi Shimon ben Gamliel?  What problem is he trying to solve?
  7. Does Rabbi Shimon’s solution work for wine used in idol worship?  Why or why not?
  8. What result, according to Rabbi Shimon, if a bottle of wine used in idol worship gets mixed into bottles of permitted wine and no one can figure out which bottle is which?
  9. When some forbidden food gets mixed thoroughly into some permitted food, the author says that d’oraita there is a general rule for deciding whether the resulting mixture is permitted.  What is that general rule?
  10. Does that general rule apply when the forbidden item becomes forbidden because it was used in idol worship?
  11. Someone Jewish has been hired to break bottles of wine from which libations have been poured.  May he or she do so?  Why or why not?

 

Mitzvah #113

  1. In question 9 above you looked for a d’oraita rule for what happens when some forbidden food gets mixed thoroughly into some permitted food.  In this essay, the author explains a d’rabanan rule for the same case.  What is that d’rabanan rule?
  2. In this essay, the author describes a case where some permitted stuff gets thoroughly mixed with some prohibited stuff, and then that mixture gets thoroughly mixed into some other permitted stuff.  The author says different rules apply depending on whether the problem with the first mixture was that it was meat and milk cooked together or whether there was some other kind of forbidden stuff that got mixed in.   See if you can describe the two cases and understand how they differ.
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